Monday, June 20, 2016

Join Crochet Motifs with One Seam



  This is such a great method to make beautiful joins, save yarn, and have less tails to weave in! When I shared the tutorial for the "Join-As-You-Go" stitch using the Love Knot, I was only creating strips with my squares. Here's a diagram to show you how to keep going for a full square or rectangular project:

crochet, tutorial, one-seam join, seamless join, join as you go, how to join squares


(And by the way, you can use this with just about any stitch!)


  I also said in the previous tutorial that this wasn't the full Join-As-You-Go method, but forgot to remind you that the true technique involves joining while working the last round of the square. This is really just a "seamless join", but you'll find some calling it Join-As-You-Go. It's a confusing situation to me, because I think of it as "joining as you go", because you don't stop crocheting the seam. Plus, a seamless join makes me think of an invisible join, not a one-seam join. Forgive me if I've confused you, and please enjoy the diagram. Have fun only weaving in only two tails after joining all your squares, no matter what you call the method. And that's it!


*Gasp* That's it? Not a full page tutorial? No lengthy instructions?

You got it! That's all you need.


  But... Here's some verbal instructions, for my non-English speaking friends using translating software: Begin where you see the green circle. The grey arrows indicate where to work a regular stitch. The black arrows indicate where to work a stitch, then join to the stitch on the opposite side. End where you see the red circle.
(I've had a few complaints about putting text on photos, because translators don't work on pictures. I hope that helps!)


Happy Crocheting!

(P.S. Find the free pattern for that square here - There's a tutorial included!) 


27 comments:

  1. Thanks for sharing this crochet tutorial with us at Cooking and Crafting with J&J! :)

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    1. And thank you for hosting the party, Julie!

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  2. This is so great!

    Thanks for joining Cooking and Crafting with J & J!

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    1. Thanks, Jess! The party was awesome this week!

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  3. Okay this is just smart. I'm pinning it for later :o)

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  4. I so needed this. Seaming is my LEAST favorite part of knitting/crocheting. I even knit entire sweaters without a single seam because I dislike it so much! But this I might be able to stand :-) Thanks for the tip!

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    1. You are welcome! And I'm right there with you on seams. I hate that feeling when I get finished with the last motif and think "done!", then realize I have to join them all together. But I'm trying to get over it. This does help.

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  5. I'm not a crocheter but it makes a lot of sense to me. A very smart method indeed Jenny. Thank you for sharing with us.

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    1. Well now, this is just future knowledge for when you pick up a hook, isn't it? ;) We might convert you to a yarn-aholic someday!

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  6. This is awesome! Joining is the worst, so I'll definitely have to give this a try :)

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    1. It makes joining so much more fun! I hope you enjoy it once you try it :)

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  7. Thanks so much for this! I've been looking all over for this type of thing. Pinned! (Found you via Moogly :)

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    1. You're welcome, Jess! And thanks for the pin!

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  8. I'm so glad I found this! I am making a queen size granny square blanket and I've been pondering how to join wihout a million loose ends! So glad I saw this on Moogly ��

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    1. That's a big project; I'm glad you found this too! Those ends can be a nightmare!

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  9. Thanks for the link Moogly. So smart =)

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  10. Hi Jenny, great idea! I'm a little confused as to what you mean by 'work stitch and join to the opposite'. How do you join to the opposite?

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    1. Hi Sophia, sorry that was confusing. Depending on the stitch you are using, you may want to skip some spaces, so I wrote the instructions loosely. When you get to the end of a square or strip, you would turn as for working rows. Then work a stitch (or a set) in the new square, and join with a slip stitch to the stitch or set that matches up.

      The love knot stitch I'm using could be a bit confusing to some, but you can watch the method being worked in this tutorial: https://crochetistheway.blogspot.com/2016/06/join-as-you-go-with-love-knots.html
      Hope that helps!

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  11. estaria bueno un video. gracias
    Isa

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  12. You should have given credit to the person who created this method. http://www.crochetcabana.com/html/join_jayg.html

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    1. I'm sorry, but Crochet Cabana didn't invent this method and doesn't claim to, either. I learned this method years ago while browsing through some ancient books my mom gave me, and I wonder if it was the "Elmore Method" as stated on the page you linked to.

      However, thank you for providing the link, since I'm unable to create videos right now. Anyone interested in learning the method by video could find help there.

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  13. does this work with Granny Squares?

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    1. Absolutely! You can follow that diagram using just about an stitch or square you like, the trick is finding the right stitch count for it.

      For example, if you were using a typical 3dc/ch-1 granny pattern, you would work the same pattern to join. If you chained 3 for corners, then chain 3 for corners when joining. You could join every dc together, or just the chain spaces. The choice is yours!

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  14. Replies
    1. It sure beats sewing in a ton of ends! :)

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