Friday, January 27, 2017

Make it Your Way Top (2)

  Part 1 of this tutorial showed you the pattern for the panels that make the top, gave you recommendations for size adjustments, and included some variations you can use to alter the shape. Here in Part 2, we will learn how to make the stitch for the seams that join the panels together. You'll also get some extra tips at the end when I show you where I made a mistake on my top. 😕


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Stitch:
Single crochet two together
Insert hook, yarn over, pull up a loop. Yarn over, pull through one loop on the hook.
(2 loops on hook) 
Insert hook in the next space (on opposite panel), yarn over, pull up a loop. Yarn over, pull through one loop. 
(3 loops on hook) 
Yarn over, pull through all three loops on the hook.


How to join the panels:

crochet, free pattern, tutorial, tank top, blouse, easy, joining stitch, single crochet 2 together, sc2tog

  • If you made the square-bottomed panel mentioned in Part 1, then you can begin joining in the bottom space of your panels. 

  • For pointy-bottomed panels like mine, skip the first four rows and begin in the fifth row. 

  • Make all seams in the same direction. Begin from the bottom and work up to the top of the panels, leaving any extra rows loose.


For the first joining stitch, I make what would be a standing-single-crochet-2-together. Whew, that sounds harder than it is! You can begin with a slipknot on the hook, join with a slip stitch, and chain 1 for the first stitch. But let me show you the way I do it, plus some time-saving tips:

Hold the tail behind the hook, and yarn over with the working end of the yarn. Bring the tail back in front of the working yarn under the hook. This makes the first loop of the stitch on your hook.
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This loop will need to be "anchored" when you begin the stitch, so this is where it gets a little tricky for beginners: You'll need to hold the loop steady on your hook - and at the same time - You hold the tail against the space you'll work into. When you insert the hook in the space, bring the hook in front of the tail so it gets caught in the stitch.
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Now, just like for a single crochet: Yarn over and pull up a loop. (2 loops on hook) The tail should be trapped between the hook and the stitch you worked into.
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But unlike a single crochet, we won't complete the stitch. Yarn over.
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Pull through only one loop. (2 loops on the hook)
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Okay, now it's time to work into the next panel! Keep the working yarn behind the hook, and insert the hook into the opposite space.
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Yarn over and pull up a loop. (3 loops on hook)
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Yarn over and pull through one loop. (3 loops on hook)
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Time to make the pieces become one! Yarn over, and pull through all three loops on the hook.
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Want to save some time? Here's where you can weave in your bottom tail as you work. bring that tail up and over your working yarn before making the next stitch.
crochet, free pattern, tutorial, tank top, blouse, easy, joining stitch, single crochet 2 together, sc2tog


For the height of the double crochet stitches I used in the panels, I made two joining stitches in each space... But that wasn't enough.
crochet, free pattern, tutorial, tank top, blouse, easy, joining stitch, single crochet 2 together, sc2tog


Because three joining stitches in a space made the seam puff up a bit, I added a chain space between rows. This is a great place to wrap the tail all the way around the working yarn (if you're working over it).
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In each remaining space, make two single-crochet-two-together, then chain 1.
crochet, free pattern, tutorial, tank top, blouse, easy, joining stitch, single crochet 2 together, sc2tog


Don't chain-1 after the last stitch! Just bind off.
Here, I'm working the seam next to an armhole panel. The seam is worked in each space of the regular panel, but the remaining rows of the armhole panel are left un-worked. In the seam below that, you can see that two rows of the regular panel were left open where it joins to a shorter panel.
crochet, free pattern, tutorial, tank top, blouse, easy, joining stitch, single crochet 2 together, sc2tog


We'll be working around those uneven spaces in the next part of the tutorial. Until then, there's a lot of joining to do! Before we close, let me show you where I ran into a problem with mine... You might find a great tip here:

crochet, free pattern, tutorial, tank top, blouse, easy, joining stitch, single crochet 2 together, sc2tog

I found myself having no problem while I was using myself as the template for my top... But in the middle of creation, my dummy (the dress form) finally arrived. I started using it to fit my top, and "thankfully" discovered that the back was just a little too small... So, I added a panel.

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Now ready to assemble the final pieces! I pinned them together on the dummy one last time to make sure...

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And after I joined the whole thing together, I realized that I had been a dummy. The dress form only goes down to a size small. I'm an extra-small. Maybe even an extra-extra small, if such a thing exists. (I exist, so I guess is does...) 

Which is where I'll give you that golden tip: It's easy to frog around the tails if you worked over them the way I showed you... But leave your end tails out! I had started to "save time" by weaving in some of my ends... Like, across the whole back piece. As in, the part I now had to rip back.

Luckily (?), I have much practice in picking out my ends.
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A little yarn wasted with the seam and extra panel made, but no endless frogging of a project worked in the round!
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There's not much I can do about the extra panel, but I can reuse the yarn from the seam to rejoin the existing panels.
crochet, free pattern, tutorial, tank top, blouse, easy, joining stitch, single crochet 2 together, sc2tog


And hey! I even came up with another variation before I put it back together... The armhole seams ended up in a way that made me think crossed straps would be cute on this top:
crochet, free pattern, tutorial, tank top, blouse, easy, joining stitch, single crochet 2 together, sc2tog



Well, mine was in one piece again in no time! There's still just a tiny bit of extra room when I try it on, but we want it that way! Coming up in the next part of the tutorial, I'll show you how we'll clean up those edges around the uneven panels.


Until then...
Happy Crocheting!


Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Make it Your Way Top (1)

  This top is easy to adjust to your own needs, but because of that I found it difficult to write an actual pattern. What I've created instead is a step-by-step tutorial teaching you how to make this top your way, using simple panels to adjust shaping and sizing. Here in part one, I'll be showing you the pattern for the panels and introducing you to the general concept of how to turn them into your new favorite blouse.


crochet, tutorial, free pattern, how to, top, shirt, blouse, tank top, easy


  Obviously, the assembled top in the photos isn't completely done - It's sort of a shell of what it will be. I'm not showing you the fully finished piece yet because I want you to make your own creation.  I'll give you tips for how to change the pattern to what you want. It can be as easy as using your favorite top for a template, or as difficult as turning your own image into a creation... And even then, it will still be easy! The lace panels can be changed to a simple rectangle if you don't like the pointy bottoms. But what if you don't want lace? Change to your favorite solid stitch instead. Let's get started with the pattern for those panels, and I'll share some more of my ideas later.


crochet, tutorial, free pattern, how to, top, shirt, blouse, tank top, easy

Materials I'm using:
Plymouth Dreambaby 4-ply
-fingering weight (1) 50% acrylic microfiber / 50% nylon; 50 grams (240 yds) per ball
I used 2 balls of the main color and one ball of the contrasting color. 
Crochet hook size F/5 - 3.75 mm
Yarn needle
Stitch markers (recommended for keeping track of pieces)

Tip: Because of variations, it is hard to say exactly how much yarn you might use for yours. My top is an extra-small. 
Following this pattern, three 50-gram balls should also be enough to make a size small. 
You will need an extra ball of the main color for size medium, and you may want to get an extra ball of the contrasting color just in case - it will be close. 
Size large will need four balls of the main color, and three balls of the contrasting color.
Any of these estimates should be increased if you plan to expand the length or use a different stitch. 


Gauge:
Following this pattern, each panel measures 1.25" (0.6 cm) wide. There are 8 rows in 4" (10 cm).

Length of gauge is not as important as width - I'll show you how to measure to make your first panel.

If using a different stitch, I would recommend working your panels somewhere between 1" - 1.5" (2.5 - 4 cm) wide.
 

Notes:
(For the panel pattern)
Chain-1 at beginning of rows does not count as a stitch.

The stitch for the panels as shown does not require a multiple for a beginning chain, but in case you're working a square bottom: Each pattern stitch = 5.


Stitches:
(American terms)
Chain
Slip stitch
Double crochet

I'll be showing you the joining stitch in part two!


Instructions for panels:


To make a square bottom panel (not shown), chain 10. Chain 1 more and start with a double crochet in the second chain from the hook. Chain 3, skip 3, double crochet. Double crochet in the next stitch, skip 3, chain 3, double crochet in the last chain. For all following rows, see instructions for row 4, and do not follow decreasing instructions for the end of the armhole panel - Just work your desired number of rows and bind off.


crochet, tutorial, free pattern, how to, top, shirt, blouse, tank top, easy

Pointy bottom panel:
To begin, chain 5 and join into a ring with a slip stitch. (This counts as row 1 for the pattern.)

Row 2:
Chain 1, turn. (Double crochet, chain 3, double crochet) in the chain-5 space.


Row 3:
Chain 1, turn. (Double crochet, chain 3, double crochet) x2 in the chain-3 space.

Row 4 and all following rows for regular panel:
Chain 1, turn. (Double crochet, chain 3, double crochet) in the first chain-3 space. (Double crochet, chain 3, double crochet in the next chain-3 space. 


Work to your desired number of rows and bind off.


For a pointy-bottom "armhole" panel
(more explained below), follow these directions for the last 3 rows:


Third from end:
Chain 1, turn. Double crochet in the first chain-3 space. Double crochet in the space between the next 2 double crochet. Double crochet in the last double crochet.

Second from end:
Chain 1, turn. Double crochet in the first double crochet. Double crochet in the last double crochet.

Last row:
Chain 4, turn, slip stitch in the last double crochet.



Step 1: Get (a few of) your measurements
You can measure directly on yourself, or use your favorite-fitting top for a guide. We will begin by determining the length for the shortest panel.

crochet, tutorial, free pattern, how to, top, shirt, blouse, tank top, easy



First, you will measure from the middle of your underarm to where you want the bottom hem to be. But don't measure right up in your armpit! You want to measure from where the underarm seam would be, so this is where another top can come in handy.

crochet, tutorial, free pattern, how to, top, shirt, blouse, tank top, easy



Next, you will need the measurement across the underarm.

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I recommend creating the pieces that will make the sides of the blouse first, so you can determine the length of the “armhole” panel. If you want wider sleeves, you can make more than one armhole panel for each side.

You will need to determine the measurement across the front (between armhole panels), but this is easily done after the side pieces are created. I slipped both pieces onto my shoulders, and simply measured the space in between them. (This gives you room to change your mind, too! If you create the sides first and decide you want a wider sleeve, then you can just add an armhole panel and keep working inward.)

Without help, measuring across your own back can be difficult! Again, this is where another top can be useful. Measure the distance between shoulder seams.

crochet, tutorial, free pattern, how to, top, shirt, blouse, tank top, easy



Step 2: Figuring the length of your pieces
My top was designed to end just past the waistline. You can easily shorten it for a festival top, or make it as long as a dress!

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It all starts with that shortest panel we measured first – From the middle of your underarm. The panels that border the shortest panels will be two rows longer. And if you need to add more panels for larger sizes, then each one will be two rows longer than the next.

The back and front panels can be changed for different styles. But I'll explain more about that later when we get to “variations”...

The longest side panel is how we determine the length of the armhole panel... It will be double that length, plus more for the armhole itself.

For example, my first short panel is 28 rows long. The panels on either side of that are 30 rows. (Larger sizes will have more panels, but we'll get to that in “sizes”.)

Since I needed to add 20 rows for the circumference of my arm, my armhole panel is 30 + 30 + 20, for a total of 80 rows.

Remember that the pointy-bottomed armhole panel has a three-row decrease at the end which counts as part of your row count.


Step 3: Make your panels!


How I made mine:
For size extra-small, here are the pieces I used to create my top.
(Bust - 28 inches/71 cm)

Sides (2 each)
One 28-row panel
Two 30-row panels
One 80-row armhole panel


Front (1 piece)
Two 28-row panels
Two 30-row panels

Back (1 piece)
Four 30-row panels
Two 32-row panels


Sizes:
I've already given you the dimensions for my size, but please remember that I'm not an average size... And that's why these directions are for you to make your project your way! Because, who's “average” anyways?

The following are just recommendations for getting close to those “average” sizes. I'm keeping the lengths the same as for my pattern, but you can adjust as needed.

(And if you plan to make more armhole panels for a wider sleeve, then remember that it will change the width of your front and back pieces.)

Small -
(Bust - 34 inches/86 cm)

Sides (2 each)
Two 28-row panels
Two 30-row panels
Armhole – Double the length of the longest side panel, plus 22 rows

Front (1 piece)
Three 28-row panels
Two 30-row panels

Back (1 piece)
Five 30-row panels
Two 32-row panels


Medium -
(Bust - 36 inches/91 cm)

Sides (2 each)
Two 28-row panels
Two 30-row panels
Two 32-row panels
Armhole – Double the length of the longest side panel, plus 24 rows

Front (1 piece)
One 28-row panel
Two 30-row panels
Two 32-row panels

Back (1 piece)
Six 30-row panels
Two 32-row panels


Large -
(Bust - 38 inches/96.5)

Sides (2 each)
Two 28-row panels
Two 30-row panels
Two 32-row panels
Armhole – Double the length of the longest side panel, plus 26 rows

Front (1 piece)
Two 28-row panels
Two 30-row panels
Two 32-row panels

Back (1 piece)
Seven 30-row panels
Two 32-row panels


Extra-large -
(Bust - 40 inches/101.5 cm)

Sides (2 each)
Three 28-row panels
Two 30-row panels
Two 32-row panels
Armhole – Double the length of the longest side panel, plus 28 rows

Front (1 piece)
Two 28-row panels
Two 30-row panels
Two 32-row panels

Back (1 piece)
Seven 30-row panels
Two 32-row panels



Variations: Oh, so many!
First, let's get to the biggest change you can make to this top... Adding sleeves! This can be achieved two different ways: 1) Join yarn in one of the bordering stitches and work the pattern stitch in the round until you reach the desired length. -or- 2) Make more panels! Which of course, leads to more variations... Make straight-bottom panels for an even cuff, or make pointy-bottomed panels so the cuff matches the hem.

*If adding sleeves, you'll probably want to make more than one armhole panel for each side.

Shapes:
For a V-neck, make one short panel for the middle, and build up the shaping with each additional panel outwards.

For a square-neck, make all the center panels the same length. 

And, hey... Get creative! You could start with a short panel next to the armhole, then build up as you go across for an asymmetrical neckline.

The back can be made in any of the same shapes, or make longer panels for a full-back tank.


Until next time:

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  That's about all I can fit in today! Coming up in the next post, I'll show you how to work the joining stitch. There's a lot more to cover like assembly, what we'll do to clean up the uneven edges left from joining, adding to the sleeves, and working around the hem. 

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  You'll have a lot of panels to make! But the quick-turning pattern will work up fast, and you'll have them done in no time. I created most of my panels before I began joining them, and things got a little disorganized... I speak with experience when I tell you to mark your pieces unless you want to count your rows over and over. I've got a lot of photos to load for the upcoming posts for the project, so I'll leave you with that last tip and wish you

Happy Crocheting!

Thursday, January 19, 2017

Faerie's Enchantment Scarf

   The double crochet cross stitch worked in rows make a warm fabric that is full of texture. Although this stitch is quite thick, it has an almost-lacy look that adds to its elegance. And with the easy pattern repeat, you might find yourself enchanted by this pattern, too... I can just imagine some winter faeries frolicking in a frozen forest while wearing this set!

crochet, free pattern, scarf, Faerie's Enchantment, Caron Cakes, Faerie Cake

  Using Caron Cakes yarn, I worked the scarf to 60" (152 cm), had enough to make the matching hat, and still had some left over. In the video tutorial, I explain that the reason I stopped short on this scarf was simply to match the colors at the ends... If you would like a longer scarf and want to make the complete set, you may want to start with the hat. If you want to make yours wider than the 6" (15 cm) shown, I can't guarantee if you'll have enough for the whole set.

crochet, free pattern, scarf, Faerie's Enchantment, Caron Cakes, Faerie Cake


Skill level:
Easy-Intermediate


Materials:
Caron Cakes yarn or equivalent
-worsted weight (4) 80% acrylic, 20% wool; 7.1 oz / 200g per ball
Crochet hook size H/8 - 5.00 mm 
Yarn needle


Gauge:
In 4" x 4" (10 cm x 10 cm)
8 pattern stitches across (16 double crochet total)
8 rows

crochet, free pattern, scarf, Faerie's Enchantment, Caron Cakes, Faerie Cake



Notes:
Chain-1 at beginning of rows does not count as a stitch.

Each row begins with chain-1, and a double crochet will be made in the first stitch.

Pattern is worked in multiples of 2; plus 2 (for beginning and end stitches)

Find a full video for this scarf here:
https://youtu.be/61gcsWtD9TY

*Please check after the written pattern for an extra note about color changes!


Stitches:
(American terms)
Chain
Double crochet

Pattern stitch:
Double crochet cross stitch - Skip one, make a double crochet. Yarn over for a double crochet. Working behind the stitch just made, insert hook from front to back in the skipped stitch (or chain). Complete the double crochet while working behind the first stitch.


Instructions:

The version shown is worked with 10 pattern stitches across. To begin, chain 23. (That's 20 for the pattern stitches + 2 for the beginning and end stitches, and one more to make the beginning chain-1.)

Row 1:
Beginning in the second chain from the hook, make a double crochet. (Skip one chain, make a double crochet. Make a double crochet in the skipped chain) x10. Make a double crochet in the last available chain.
(22 stitches total)


Row 2 and all following rows:
Chain 1, turn. Make a double crochet in the first stitch. (Skip one, double crochet; double crochet in the skipped stitch) x10. Make a double crochet in the last available stitch.


Work to desired length; bind off and weave in ends.

*About those color changes: I let the magic of Caron Cakes happen on its own, and ended up with color changes in the middle of rows. To avoid the jog, you can cut and rejoin your yarn when you reach a new color in the Cake. Pull the new color through the last two loops of the last double crochet in the row.
Most of the colors change so subtly that it can't be noticed... But there's one spot between a bold and pastel tone that bugs me.

crochet, free pattern, scarf, Faerie's Enchantment, Caron Cakes, Faerie Cake


  Well, now I have the new camera and a dummy! All I have to do is learn to not dress the dummy in the same color as the pattern. And to use the right lens so I can get the whole project in the picture! I'm not happy with the photo, but I want to show this scarf worn in the "keyhole" fashion, just because I like it that way:

crochet, free pattern, scarf, Faerie's Enchantment, Caron Cakes, Faerie Cake


Happy Crocheting!

Monday, January 16, 2017

Waiting

  I am a patient person. I wasn't always this way, and I owe my change all to crocheting. I used to fidget nonstop. I couldn't stand waiting somewhere like a doctor's office and would pace around waiting rooms. I would be screaming inside my head (and sometimes out loud) in slow traffic. Through crochet, I've found a way to focus my extra energy into something productive. When I'm not working on something, I'm thinking about a pattern. And thanks to a healthy yarn stash, I don't mind having to wait when I run out of yarn for a project... I just start another!


crochet, lace, top, panels



  Okay, so maybe that's not always the best cure. Although my couch is slowly reappearing from the WIP pile, I'm still starting new projects. But, wait! I promise I'm not starting anything I won't finish. When I ran out of yarn for The Kid's purple mystery, I picked up another project that I've been slowly working out. I decided I hated it and ripped the whole thing back, then started over with another design. While digging through the stash, I found two other colors of the yarn I'm using. Yay!


Plymouth, Dreambaby, 4 ply, fingering weight, yarn


  I began working out pieces that will make my new top, now planning to use all three colors. I think the bluish-green yarn goes well with the cream, and it goes well with the yellow. But after a few minutes of staring at it on the table, I just couldn't like all three colors together. Plus, this pattern is using a bunch of strips joined together. Won't striping the colors just make it more difficult to work out other sizes? As it is now, you could just insert an extra panel or two to increase the size. Ah, easy is better.


crochet, top, lace, panels



  In the end, I added color by using the cream for the seams between pieces. I gives a nice pinstripe effect without making a loud design of colors. (But you could also make this in all one color!) By using this reversible seam, the project looks great on both sides. I prefer the side that has a little texture over the flat side... What do you think?


crochet, lace, top, panels


  So, this top was originally started as another project for The Kid. After having her try it on, I realized that it would be way too small... I tried to get the size right by adding a few inches to what fit me. (She is blessed where I am cursed, and it makes fitting a bit difficult when she's not around.) Instead of ripping back all I had done, I kept working the project to fit me. When I turned the tables and ripped it back anyways, I guess I could have gone back to making something for her... Since I already have the fluffy purple thing on the hook for her, I don't think she'll mind the trade-off. And oh, would you look at that... I happened to find some purple yarn in the same weight while digging through that stash... Guess maybe I'll have to make her one after all. 😉


Loops & Threads, Woolike, purple


  Now, let's get past all this rambling and into the thoughts that inspired it... I've found myself waiting on many things this week. 1) Buying more yarn: Check. Yesterday I made the trip and bought the last three balls, so I can be sure I'll have enough to finish. And I stuck to the rules. Besides another pack of stitch markers, that's all I bought. 2) My new camera! As of when I stared this post, the tracking information said it would be here today... And just right now while I was writing, it finally showed up!

Canon Rebel T5, kit, accessories


  That only leaves 3) An adjustable dressform. I'm still waiting. It was ordered... Two weeks ago? And I'm still waiting. Instead of getting antsy over it, I keep crocheting. Thanks to electronic tracking, I know it's on its very, very slow way. Once I have it, I'll be able to design things without having The Kid here for sizing. Until then: If it fits me, then I have a new top. And I can use the dummy later to make her another... In purple, of course.


  Well, work got a little buried under the frenzy of un-boxing the new camera. I had planned on getting my top finished tonight, but now maybe I won't. I'm itching to play with my new toy. This pattern is still going faster than I thought, being made with fingering weight yarn and a smaller hook. The panels are worked in a quick-turning multiple of two, and I only have a few more to make for a size small. We'll see how it goes. On second thought, I think I'll play with the camera tomorrow. Just like other things, it can wait... As long as there's something else to do. And especially if that something happens to be

Happy Crocheting!


PS- Have one last photo from the old camera to say goodbye. There. See? The crochet is back on the table, and the new camera is in its box until tomorrow. I promise. Seriously. I have to wait for the battery to charge, anyways... It might be done by midnight.

crochet, lace top, Canon Powershot

😉

Friday, January 13, 2017

She Made Me Do It

  I've been so involved with other projects that I forgot to update you all with the latest yarn purchase... I know, I promised not to buy more. The Kid made me do it; I swear! Some of her friends surprised her with some holiday gifts, so she wanted to get some things to return the favor. She chose to go shopping at the craft store. Then she took a wrong turn and led me right into the yarn section. Next thing I knew, all of this was in the basket:

yarn, shopping, Michaels, Caron, Loops & Threads


  There was more, too. Some of that got used up in an all-night crochet tornado of making gift bags (and a tie) for her friends. I took pictures of the bags, but lost them somewhere in the new computer. And the tie was finished last-minute before she left, so I never got a photo of that it. Each were made with Caron Simply Soft, which happened to be available in all of their favorite colors... Of course, I let her pick out a few skeins in colors she liked, too. She picked out the brightest red and a beautiful purple which unfortunately comes out a bit dull in the pictures:

yarn, Caron Simply Soft, Iris


  Directly across the aisle from Simply Soft is a wall of Loops & Threads Charisma on sale for $2 a ball! "Ooo! Get it! Get it! Get it!"... That was me speaking, not her. She's obsessed with purple, and they had this awesome heather in an amethyst tone. I knew exactly what it was going to be when I saw it. We (I) bought four balls.

yarn, Loops & Threads Charisma, purple


  Of all those purchases I can blame solely on The Kid, there was one I made of my own choosing... Though I did make her pick the color. I was a bit scared to try another new yarn from Loops & Threads after my mishaps with Facets, but I do enjoy working with Charisma, so not all of their yarns are bad. (Just that one.) Since this stuff looks to be a cheaper version of Simply Soft, I decided to compare it:

yarn, Loops & Threads Soft & Shiny, Caron Simply Soft


  At first comparison, Loops & Threads Soft & Shiny is even more shiny and softer than Caron Simply Soft. I haven't worked with it yet to know if the gauge will match, but Soft & Shiny seems to be a little thicker than Simply Soft. And just like Facets, it appears to be tightly spun when balled up, but as soon as you pull it from the skein, you can see loose fibers. Oops! Well, would you look at that... While trying to pull the tail out to show you, this skein spit out a little yarn vomit. We can't have that mess sitting around now, can we? I'll have to get a hook and start experimenting!

Loops & Threads Soft & Shiny, yarn, Michaels
  

  But first... There's this little thing I started that will have to be finished up. Didn't I mention that there was four balls of that Charisma purchased? So, where's the pretty picture of all of them piled up in all their glory? Sorry, all I can give you is this:

Loops & Threads Charisma, yarn, Michaels


  Um... Should I explain that I'm still having trouble with insomnia? Instead of letting it bother me, I've just worked it into my schedule as "free time". Free time to work on whatever I want. The pretty purple fluff called to me from the bag, asking why I left it in there. My latest session of Free Time was dedicated to helping it evolve into the vision I had for it:

Loops & Threads Charisma, vest, rectangle, granny


  I think I like Free Time! Especially when it involves chunky yarn that works up quickly. And as a purple-lover myself, this one is just a treat to watch grow. I won't be sharing a full photo of the project yet because I want to keep it a bit of a secret from The Kid. All I'll say for now is: Wow, this one is gonna be great.

  Well, in that last photo you might notice the sun going down for the day. I guess it's time to go make some food... Rip van Winkle came home hungry. I'd say I can probably have this project finished by tomorrow, but I won't. It's a Free Time project that's not on a program. Maybe I'll get some sleep tonight. Or maybe there will just be more


Happy Crocheting!